Teams across Amazon’s fulfilment centres and delivery stations across Australia dressed a little differently for work this week—wearing pajamas to work to raise awareness and funds for children with cancer as part of an annual global Amazon initiative ‘Amazon Goes Gold for Childhood Cancer.’

On 15 and 16 September, Amazon teams in Sydney, Melbourne and Perth wore their PJs to work, PJammin in solidarity with the almost 1,000 Australian children and adolescents who are diagnosed with cancer each year and spend months, even years, in their pajamas during treatment and recovery. Teams were invited to wear PJs to work and make a donation which will be matched by Amazon.

“Pajamas are the battle uniform for kids with cancer during their treatment and recovery.”
Craig Fuller
Amazon Australia director of operations

Amazon supports communities in which we operate and will donate funds raised during Amazon Goes Gold, and a further $60,000 to support cancer programs at the Sydney Children’s Hospital Network, the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne and Perth Children’s Hospital.

“Our teams across the country had a ball PJammin in their PJs this week for an incredible cause, raising much needed awareness and funds for kids and their families affected by cancer, said Craig Fuller, director of operations at Amazon Australia said. "Pyjamas are the battle uniform for kids with cancer during their treatment and recovery. We’re proud to be donning our best onesies and PJs this week to show we stand in solidarity with these children and their families.”

Amazon teams were PJammin this week
Amazon teams were PJammin this week
Amazon teams were PJammin this week
Amazon teams were PJammin this week
Amazon teams were PJammin this week
Amazon teams were PJammin this week
Amazon teams were PJammin this week

“Amazon Goes Gold not only raises awareness for the struggles faced by children with cancer, but also shines a spotlight on the inspiring research work that is being done by many organisations to combat this disease and increase survival rates,” he said.

Globally, 100,000 children die from cancer every year, being the leading cause of death by disease among children in many countries. In Australia, over 950 children and adolescents (0-19 year olds) are diagnosed with cancer each year.